Breaking: Pentagon Review Says America’s Nukes Are FUBAR

The guys babysitting our missiles in Montana couldn’t agree more.

—By 


Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is ordering a massive overhaul of America’s nuclear weapons program after finding it to be plagued with “fundamental flaws,” the AP reported this evening. Pentagon-commissioned reviews of the nuclear forces have found outdated equipment, weak leadership, and abysmal morale among the men and women responsible for maintaining and launching some of the most destructive weapons on the planet. Many of the problems were already well known, but the language the Pentagon is using to describe them is uncharacteristically strong. “Hagel’s reviews concluded that the structure of US nuclear weapons forces is so incoherent that it cannot be properly managed,” noted the AP, which got a briefing on the highlights from two senior defense officials.

“Nothing the Air Force is doing is going to reduce the risk. It’s not missileers who are at fault, it’s the mission.”

The latest review, which was expected to be released this week, was conducted by Retired General James Welch, a former top nuclear commander whom the Pentagon has tapped repeatedly to assess problems with its nuclear oversight. In 2007, Welch led the initial outside review of what remains the worst nuclear weapons scandal in recent years: Six nuclear missiles went missing for 36 hours after a crew at Minot Air Force Base mistakenly loaded them onto a plane and flew them across the country. (See our timeline: “That Time We Almost Nuked North Carolina.”) Welch later directed two follow-up assessments in April 2011 and April 2013, the last of which noted improvements and concluded that “the nuclear force is professional, disciplined, committed and attentive to the special demands of the mission.”

But that conclusion was quickly called into question by a string of new scandals, as detailed in “Death Wears Bunny Slippers,” my recent feature story about the ICBM program. In the months following Welch’s review, 98 missileers were implicated in a cheating scandal and nine midlevel commanders were fired; a leaked email from the commander of the nuclear missile wing at North Dakota’s Minot Air Force base complained of “rot” in the missile force; and Gen. Michael Carey was removed as commander of the ICBM program after an official trip to Russia, where he engaged in “inappropriate behavior,” including heavy drinking, rudeness to his hosts, and associating with “suspect” women. Just last week, the Air Force fired two high-level commanders in the ICBM program and disciplined a third for various leadership lapses, including the maltreatment of subordinates.

Welch has since distanced himself from last year’s rosy assessment. His spokesman told the AP that the 2013 report was addressing organizational aspects of the nuclear mission and not primarily personnel and attitude issues.

The Air Force has long struggled to create a balance between strong oversight of missileers and the need to create a rewarding work environment that attracts talented recruits. Following the 2007 missing-nukes scandal, the Air Force instituted a regimen of strict tests and inspections that “was as much punishment as it was rigor,” Lt. General Stanley Kowalski, now the Deputy Commander of US Strategic Command, said at the time. In a follow-up report three years later, Welch suggested that the strategy had backfired by sowing mistrust and creating a sense of “nuclear paranoia”—talented airmen were avoiding nuclear weapons jobs.

According to the AP, Hagel will seek to invest an additional $1 to $10 billion in the nuclear program and promote its top commanders to give the nuclear wing more clout within the Air Force bureaucracy.

During my reporting for “Death Wears Bunny Slippers,” I interviewed a slew of nuclear policy experts and traveled to Great Falls, Montana—home to Malmstrom Air Force Base—where I spent time with current and former missileers. They told me of the mind-numbing boredom of babysitting ICBMs for 24 hours straight, of cheating on proficiency tests, of how one colonel made them shit in a box because he didn’t want to take the missiles offline to fix the toilets. They were basically dying to get the hell out.

The consensus among the experts was that no amount of funding or attention will be enough to fix the ICBM program’s biggest problem: obsolescence. “I am deeply disappointed with the happy talk coming out of the Air Force and Department of Defense on this,” Joseph Cirincione, president of the Ploughshares Fund, a foundation focused on nuclear weapons policy, told me. (Disclosure: Ploughshares has provided some funding for Mother Jones’ national security reporting.) “These missileers are in dead-end jobs and they know it. They pull 24-hour shifts underground waiting to push a button that they know they are never going to push, and if they did, they would be condemning hundreds of thousands of civilians to death. What kind of job is that? New helicopters and new managers are not going to fix this problem. Nothing the Air Force is doing is going to reduce the risk. It’s not missileers who are at fault, it’s the mission.”

Source.

Are you awake yet? Government-enforced medical quarantines just went from ‘conspiracy theory’ to official policy in NJ and NY

Are you awake yet? Government-enforced medical quarantines just went from 'conspiracy theory' to official policy in NJ and NY - NaturalNews.com

naturalnews.com 

Published October 25 2014
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, NaturalNews Editor

(NaturalNews) The states of New York and New Jersey have leapfrogged federal guidelines and set up their own mandatory 21-day quarantine requirements for arriving passengers who had direct contact with Ebola patients in West Africa.

“The patients with the highest level of possible exposure will be automatically quarantined for 21 days at a government-regulated facility,” reports CBS News. [1] Government-run quarantine camps, in other words, are now a present-day reality in America.

“We believe it within the State of New York and the State of New Jersey’s legal rights” says Governor Cuomo. And it almost certainly is. In fact, this move by New Jersey and New York is one of the smartest things any government official has yet done in the United States to thwart the spread of Ebola.

But take notice of something worth considering: Do you see how quickly we are calling for mandatory government quarantines? It didn’t take much, either. Just one returning passenger with Ebola in New York City was all it took, in fact. Suddenly, we are all supporting a police which was considered a whacky theory just a few years ago.

 

Five years ago, talk of government quarantines was called a “conspiracy theory”

Consider the history of the very idea of government-mandated medical quarantines. Just five years ago, anyone suggesting that such a thing could be happening in the USA was called a “conspiracy theorist.” I know this because I’m one of the few people who warned about precisely this scenario many years earlier, and I’m often called a conspiracy theorist for accurately predicting things that would come true years later.

As soon as Ebola arrived in America, however, all talk of mandatory quarantines suddenly shifted from “conspiracy theory” to “medical protocols.” Suddenly the idea of forcing certain people into government-run facilities from which they are not allowed to leave — a sort of medical prison — was being openly talked about as an important option to consider.

In Dallas, the family members of the late Thomas Duncan were spotted violating their self-quarantine and were ordered back into a self-enforced lockdown. Not long after that, NBC’s “just get your damn flu shot” medical correspondent Dr. Snyderman got caught violating her self-quarantine after returning from West Africa where she might have picked up Ebola. And just a few days ago, Dr. Spencer in NYC decided to spend a night on the town while claiming he was also “self-quarantined.” It didn’t take long for officials to realize that the entire idea of a self-quarantine is completely bogus for the simple reason that nobody follows it.

It turns out that even doctors and journalists violate self quarantines, meaning that we can’t trust people to faithfully quarantine themselves. Suddenly the idea of a government-enforced mandatory quarantine made all kinds of sense. It didn’t sound like a conspiracy theory anymore. It sounded like a sensible idea to help stop the spread of Ebola.

 

If a forced quarantine is justified for one person, it can be justified for one million

Now we live in a nation where public sentiment openly supports government-enforced quarantines of people who might carry Ebola. Notice how quickly this all happened? Some might even point out the problem-reaction-solution overlay to all this, proposing that Ebola has been hyped up for precisely the purpose of rolling out a medical police state in America. I don’t personally think we are there yet, but we are clearly on the path towards it, and there’s nothing stopping the President from announcing a nationwide medical police state right this very minute.

If the government claimed the authority to detain one person suspected of carrying Ebola, that same authority must also apply to one million people, you see. What you are witnessing right now, in other words, is absolute proof that all of us who warned about government quarantines and the mass rounding up of citizens to be placed into FEMA camps were, in fact, rather prophetic.

The things we warned about five years ago that sounded crazy at the time are now national news headlines. If I had said in 2009 that a level-4 biohazard viral infection would be running loose across New York City, most people would have utterly dismissed the idea as loony tunes. And yet that’s exactly where we are right now.

Those of you who are among the more astute observers of reality will notice that the domains www.BioDefense.com and BiologicalTerrorism.com were registered 15 years ago. In other words, yes, I saw this coming 15 years ago and had the domains registered with the intention of sitting on them until the future arrived.

I have also purchased domain names on other future events which I know are coming, but if I were to mention any of those right now, they would seem just as crazy as an Ebola outbreak in NYC would have seemed until recently. The simple truth is that most people aren’t ready for a future that’s any different from their present. They can’t envision change coming, so they live in a state of denial about what that future may bring.

 

Those who see what’s coming are the most sane of all

There are some of us who are blessed (or cursed) with the ability to see what’s coming. I’ve often said that a person who knows what will happen in 1-2 years is considered a “genius” by society, while a person who knows what will happen in 10 – 20 years is called a kook. That’s because there is a psychological phenomenon known as a normalcy bias which functions as a kind of mental momentum, keeping people cognitively locked into a very narrow set of expectations while dissuading them from exploring any real change in the world around them.

If I told you that the United States of America as we know it today will come to an end before 20 years from now, most people can’t cognitively process the concept because of their normalcy bias. So I don’t bother explaining the details until the time comes, because only then will people have enough evidence in front of their own eyes to realize the magnitude of the changes unfolding before them.

You wouldn’t believe how many feature stories I’ve written and then archived without publishing them for this very reason. Recently, I wrote a story about the risk of Ebola terrorism taking place in New York City, but I realized the public wasn’t ready to hear that yet so I shelved it. I may still publish it, but not before the public is ready to grasp the message with more clarity. If I publish it right now, too many people will remain in a state of denial and anger because they hate any new information that challenges their Matrix-like mental constructs.

There are many other things the public isn’t ready to hear. Remember, America is a place where people are so willing to remain willfully hypnotized by socially-accepted delusions that they still think JFK was assassinated by a lone gunman and that the WTC 7 building collapsed in perfect symmetry due to a small office fire. We are all living in a nation dominated by delusional people who are sleepwalking through a fictional construct, which is precisely why they are so psychological shocked when something happens that they never considered: A viral outbreak, a solar flare, a grid down power failure, a nuclear accident, a debt implosion or even 98 million people being injected with primate cancer viruses as part of a nationwide polio vaccination scheme, which is exactly what already happened in U.S. history.

 

Three serious threats to America right now

If you want to know what’s really on my radar right now, there are three things that I suppose I will dare to mention briefly. The first is the Ebola outbreak, which I believe will be kept under control in the USA for the next 12 months or so, but if Ebola becomes endemic in Central or South America, then North America will be in serious trouble and may have an uncontrolled spread within 24 months.

The second thing on my radar right now is an impending stock market crash that would rival the “Black Monday” crash of 1987. The market is being pumped up right now with $200 billion a quarter in money creation by the Fed. Interest rates are near zero while inflation is around 6% or more. Right now, a massive wealth confiscation scheme is taking place, siphoning billions of dollars in purchasing power from the American people without them even knowing it. The minute the Fed stops pumping dollars into the system, it will catastrophically collapse.

The third thing on my mind is the possibility of the Russians waging a nuclear attack on the USA immediately after the country is weakened either by a viral pandemic or a devastating stock market crash. The mainstream news hasn’t covered it much lately, but Russian strategic nuclear bombers have been making practice runs near Alaska. Russian warplanes are conducting aggressive probing maneuvers on attack vectors to U.S. targets. While neither Russia nor China would dare attack the USA on a normal day, a weakened nation suffering from a devastating economic collapse or a nationwide viral pandemic would create precisely the circumstances during which aggressor nations (like Russia) might pounce.

These three things are fast approaching and represent real, legitimate risks to our nation. Everyone interested in preparedness, self-reliance and survival should seriously consider these scenarios. Learn about Ebola survival and preparedness at www.BioDefense.com

And remember: The government quarantines of suspected Ebola carriers has now begun. It is no longer a conspiracy theory; it is now policy.

 

Source.

Round-op Alpha: List R-oA2014

List R-oA2014

GLOBAL OPERATION FOR THE ARREST OF THE WORLD GOVERNMENT

The following 741 individuals all actively and knowingly conspire in well-planned efforts and constructions to consolidate power and resources – with the intention to establish a world government which would provide them with full immunity from any form of prosecution regarding their past and future crimes – and are therefore, according to Round-op Alpha, collectively guilty of crimes against the sovereignty of their respective nations and against humanity as a whole, i.e.:

  • High-level brigandage: Looting of public wealth; oppressing of populations; attacking the rights to good health, education, personal/national sovereignty and real security; the murdering in name of corporate profits; democide; psychological warfare; (eco-) terrorism – which deliberately jeopardizes any attempts for world peace and causes regional, cultural tensions, armed conflicts, forced poverty and the decay of the public’s health, the public order and society as a whole.

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UNITED NATIONS

  1. Ki-moon, Ban /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  2. Eliasson, Jan /SWEDEN/ PDF
  3. Malcorra, Susana /ARGENTINA/ PDF
  4. Ashe, John W. /ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA/ PDF
  5. Sajdik, Martin /AUSTRIA – USA/ PDF
  6. Tomka, Peter /SLOVAKIA/ PDF
  7. Sepúlveda-Amor, Bernardo /MEXICO/ PDF
  8. Pachauri, Rajendra K. /INDIA/ PDF
  9. Lee, Hoesung /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  10. van Ypersele, Jean-Pascal /BELGIUM/ PDF
  11. El Gizouli, Ismail A.R. /SUDAN/ PDF
  12. Bokova, Irina /BULGARIA/ PDF
  13. da Silva, José Graziano /BRAZIL/ PDF
  14. Aliu, Olumuyiwa Benard /NIGERIA/ PDF
  15. Nwanze, Kanayo F. /NIGERIA/ PDF
  16. Sekimizu, Koji /JAPAN/ PDF
  17. Lagarde, Christine /FRANCE/ PDF
  18. Lipton, David /USA/ PDF
  19. Viñals, José /SPAIN/ PDF
  20. Blanchard, Olivier /FRANCE/ PDF
  21. Touré, Hamadoun /MALI/ PDF
  22. Zhao, Houlin /CHINA/ PDF
  23. Yong, Li /CHINA/ PDF
  24. Chan, Margaret /CHINA/ PDF
  25. Halton, Jane /AUSTRALIA/PDF
  26. Grimes, David /CANADA/ PDF
  27. Moura, Antonio Divino /BRAZIL/ PDF
  28. Ostojski, Mieczyslaw S. /POLAND/ PDF
  29. Mokssit, Abdalah /MOROCCO/ PDF
  30. Zerbo, Lassina /BURKINA FASO/ PDF
  31. Dubourg, Thierry /FRANCE/ PDF
  32. Li, Genxin /CHINA/ PDF
  33. Bell, W. Randy /USA/ PDF
  34. Maryssael, Vorian /MEXICO/ PDF
  35. Rozhkov, Oleg /RUSSIA/ PDF
  36. Ozawa, Toshiro /JAPAN/ PDF
  37. Azeez, Aliyar Lebbe Abdul /SRI LANKA/ PDF
  38. Haak, Hein [12] /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  39. Weston, Michael [12] /UK/ PDF
  40. Amano, Yukiya /JAPAN/ PDF
  41. Dunn Lee, Janice /USA/ PDF
  42. Mohamad, Daud /MALAYSIA/ PDF
  43. Aning, Kwaku /GHANA – USA/ PDF
  44. Varjoranta, Tero /FINLAND/ PDF
  45. Bychkov, Alexander /RUSSIA/ PDF
  46. Flory, Denis /FRANCE/ PDF
  47. Horin, Olexandr [12] /UKRAINE/ PDF
  48. Azevêdo, Roberto /BRAZIL/ PDF
  49. Agah, Yonov Frederick [12] /NIGERIA/ PDF
  50. Brauner, Karl [12] /GERMANY/ PDF
  51. Shark, David [12] /USA/ PDF
  52. Xiaozhun, Yi [12] /CHINA/ PDF
  53. Gore, Al /USA/ PDF
  54. Buffett, Warren [2] /USA/ PDF

WORLD BANK GROUP

  1. Kim, Jim Yong [12] /USA – SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  2. Indrawati, Sri Mulyani /INDONESIA – USA/ PDF
  3. Badré, Bertrand /FRANCE/ PDF
  4. Mohieldin, Mahmoud /EGYPT/ PDF
  5. Basu, Kaushik [12] /INDIA/ PDF
  6. Leroy, Anne-Marie /FRANCE/ PDF
  7. Kyte, Rachel /USA/ PDF
  8. De Villeroche, Hervé /FRANCE/ PDF
  9. Hines, Gwen /UK/ PDF
  10. Hoven, Ingrid G. /GERMANY/ PDF
  11. Aviel, Sara Margalit [12] /USA/ PDF
  12. Suzuki, Hideaki /JAPAN/ PDF
  13. Chen, Shixin /CHINA/ PDF

BILDERBERG

  1. Rothensteiner, Walter /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  2. Treichl, Andreas /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  3. Sigurgestsson, Hörður /ICELAND/ PDF
  4. Lundestad, Geir /NORWAY/ PDF
  5. de Oliveira, Manuel Ferreira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  6. Salgado, Ricardo /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  7. Silva, Artur Santos /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  8. Mazzie, Mark G. /USA/ PDF
  9. McKinnon, Neil /CANADA/ (status unknown) PDF
  10. Sikora, Sławomir /POLAND/ PDF
  11. Bon, Michel /FRANCE/ PDF
  12. Lévy-Lang, André /FRANCE/ PDF
  13. Schrempp, Jürgen Erich /GERMANY/ PDF
  14. Szwajcowski, Jacek /POLAND/ PDF
  15. Barnevik, Percy Nils /SWEDEN/ PDF
  16. Stråberg, Hans /SWEDEN/ PDF
  17. Uǧur, Agah [2] /TURKEY/ PDF
  18. Browne, Edmund John Philip /UK/ PDF
  19. Gerstner, Louis Vincent /USA/ PDF
  20. Bergsten, C. Fred /FRANCE/ PDF
  21. Pipes, Richard Edgar [2] /USA/ PDF
  22. Black, Conrad Moffat /CANADA/ PDF
  23. Frum, David J. /CANADA/ PDF
  24. Beytout, Nicolas /FRANCE/ PDF
  25. Rossella, Carlo /ITALY/ PDF
  26. Ringier, Michael /SWITZERLAND/ PDF
  27. Kohen, Sami [2] /TURKEY/ PDF
  28. Hutton, William Nicolas /UK/ PDF
  29. Knight, Andrew Stephen Bower /UK/ PDF
  30. Stephanopoulos, George Robert /USA/ PDF
  31. Scheel, Walter /GERMANY/ PDF
  32. Eliot, Theodore L. /USA/ PDF
  33. Yost, Casimir A. /USA/ PDF
  34. Allaire, Paul Arthur /USA/ PDF
  35. Rockefeller, Sharon Percy /USA/ PDF

BILDERBERG [2010201120122013]

  1. Davignon, Etienne /BELGIUM/ Vice Chairman, Suez-Tractebel PDF
  2. Achleitner, Paul M. /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Deutsche Bank AG PDF
  3. Ackermann, Josef /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Management Board and the Group Executive Committee, Deutsche Bank AG PDF
  4. Agius, Marcus /UK/ Former Chairman, Barclays Bank PLC PDF
  5. Ajami, Fouad /USA/ Senior Fellow, The Hoover Institution, Stanford University PDF
  6. Alexander, Helen /UK/ Chairman, UBM plc PDF
  7. Alexander, Keith B. /USA/ Commander, USCYBERCOM; Director, National Security AgencyPDF
  8. Alierta, César /SPAIN/ Chairman and CEO, TelefónicaPDF
  9. Almunia, Joaquín /SPAIN/ Commissioner, European Commission PDF
  10. Altman, Roger C. /USA/ Chairman, Evercore Partners Inc. PDF
  11. Amado, Luís /PORTUGAL/ Chairman, Banco Internacional do Funchal (BANIF) PDF
  12. Andresen, Johan H. /NORWAY/ Owner and CEO, FERDPDF
  13. Apunen, Matti /FINLAND/ Director, Finnish Business and Policy Forum EVA PDF
  14. Arrison, Sonia /USA/ Author and policy analyst PDF
  15. Athey, Susan /USA/ Professor of Economics, Stanford Graduate School of Business PDF
  16. Aydıntaşbaş, Aslı /TURKEY/ Columnist, Milliyet Newspaper PDF
  17. Babacan, Ali /TURKEY/ Deputy Prime Minister for Economic and Financial Affairs PDF
  18. Bäckström, Urban /SWEDEN/ Director General, Confederation of Swedish Enterprise PDF
  19. Balls, Edward M. /UK/ Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer PDF
  20. Balsemão, Francisco Pinto /PORTUGAL/ Chairman and CEO, IMPRESA, S.G.P.S.; Former Prime MinisterPDF
  21. Barré, Nicolas /FRANCE/ Managing Editor, Les EchosPDF
  22. Barroso, José M. Durão /PORTUGAL/ President, European Commission PDF
  23. Baverez, Nicolas /FRANCE/ Partner, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP PDF
  24. Bavinchove, Olivier de /FRANCE/ Commander, Eurocorps PDF
  25. Bazire, Nicolas /FRANCE/ Managing Director, Groupe Arnault /LVMH PDF
  26. Béchu, Christophe /FRANCE/ Senator, and Chairman, General Council of Maine-et-Loire PDF
  27. Bell, John /UK/ Regius Professor of Medicine, University of Oxford PDF
  28. Berberoğlu, Enis /TURKEY/ Editor-in-Chief, Hürriyet Newspaper PDF
  29. Bernabè, Franco /ITALY/ CEO, Telecom Italia S.p.A.PDF
  30. Bezos, Jeff /USA/ Founder and CEO, Amazon.com PDF
  31. Bildt, Carl /SWEDEN/ Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  32. Björling, Ewa /SWEDEN/ Minister for Trade PDF
  33. Blåfield, Antti /FINLAND/ Senior Editorial Writer, Helsingin Sanomat PDF
  34. Boles, Nick /UK/ Member of Parliament PDF
  35. Bolland, Marc J. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chief Executive, Marks and Spencer Group plc PDF
  36. Bonnier, Jonas /SWEDEN/ President and CEO, Bonnier AB PDF
  37. Borg, Anders /SWEDEN/ Minister for Finance PDF
  38. Botín, Ana P. /SPAIN/ Executive Chairman, BanestoPDF
  39. Boxmeer, Jean François van /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chairman of the Executive Board and CEO, Heineken N.V. PDF
  40. Brabeck-Letmathe, Peter /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Nestlé S.A. PDF
  41. Brandtzæg, Svein Richard /NORWAY/ CEO, Norsk Hydro ASA PDF
  42. Bredow, Vendeline von /UK/ Business Correspondent, The Economist PDF
  43. Bronner, Oscar /AUSTRIA/ Publisher and Editor, Der Standard PDF
  44. Çakir, Ruşen /TURKEY/ Journalist PDF
  45. Cameron, David /UK/ Prime Minister PDF
  46. Campbell, Gordon /CANADA/ Premier of British Columbia PDF
  47. Carlsson, Gunilla /SWEDEN/ Minister for International Development Cooperation PDF
  48. Carney, Mark J. /CANADA/ Governor, Bank of CanadaPDF
  49. Carvajal Urquijo, Jaime /SPAIN/ Managing Director, Advent International PDF
  50. Castries, Henri de /FRANCE/ Chairman of the Management Board and CEO, AXA PDF
  51. Cebrián, Juan Luis /SPAIN/ CEO, PRISA PDF
  52. Cernko, Willibald /AUSTRIA/ CEO, UniCredit Bank Austria AG PDF
  53. Chalendar, Pierre André de /FRANCE/ Chairman and CEO, Saint-Gobain PDF
  54. Chavannes, Marc E. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Political Columnist, NRC Handelsblad; Professor of Journalism, University of Groningen PDF
  55. Christiansen, Jeppe /DENMARK/ CEO, Maj Invest PDF
  56. Chubais, Anatoly B. /RUSSIA/ CEO, OJSC RUSNANOPDF
  57. Ciliv, Süreyya /TURKEY/ CEO, Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri A.S. PDF
  58. Cisneros, Gustavo A. /SPAIN/ Chairman and CEO, Cisneros Group of Companies PDF
  59. Clark, W. Edmund /CANADA/ President and CEO, TD Bank Financial Group PDF
  60. Clarke, Kenneth /UK/ Member of Parliament, Lord Chancellor and Secretary of Justice PDF
  61. Coene, Luc /BELGIUM/ Governor, National Bank of Belgium PDF
  62. Collins, Timothy C. /USA/ Senior Managing Director and CEO, Ripplewood Holdings, LLC PDF
  63. Conti, Fulvio /ITALY/ CEO and General Manager, Enel SpA PDF
  64. Corydon, Bjarne /DENMARK/ Minister of Finance PDF
  65. Cospedal, María Dolores de /SPAIN/Secretary General, Partido Popular PDF
  66. Cowper-Coles, Sherard /UK/ Business Development Director, International, BAE Systems plc PDF
  67. Cucchiani, Enrico Tommaso /ITALY/ CEO, Intesa Sanpaolo SpA PDF
  68. Daele, Frans van /BELGIUM/ Chief of Staff to the President of the European Council PDF
  69. Daniels, Jr., Mitchell E. /USA/ Governor of IndianaPDF
  70. David, George A. /GREECE/ Chairman, Coca-Cola H.B.C. S.A. PDF
  71. Davis, Ian /UK/ Chairman, Rolls-Royce plc PDF
  72. DeMuth, Christopher /USA/ Distinguished Fellow, Hudson Institute PDF
  73. Dijkgraaf, Robbert H. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Director and Leon Levy Professor, Institute for Advanced Study PDF
  74. Dinçer, Haluk /TURKEY/ President, Retail and Insurance Group, Sabancı Holding A.S. PDF
  75. Donilon, Thomas E. /USA/ National Security Advisor, The White House PDF
  76. Dudley, Robert /UK/ Group Chief Executive, BP plcPDF
  77. Eberstadt, Nicholas N. /USA/ Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy, American Enterprise Institute PDF
  78. Eide, Espen Barth /NORWAY/ Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  79. Ekholm, Börje /SWEDEN/ President and CEO, Investor AB PDF
  80. Eldrup, Anders /DENMARK/ CEO, DONG Energy PDF
  81. Elkann, John /ITALY/ Chairman, Fiat S.p.A. PDF
  82. Enders, Thomas /GERMANY/ CEO, Airbus SAS PDF
  83. Entrecanales, José Manuel /SPAIN/ Chairman, Acciona PDF
  84. Evans, J. Michael /USA/ Vice Chairman, Global Head of Growth Markets, Goldman Sachs & Co. PDF
  85. Faymann, Werner /AUSTRIA/ Federal Chancellor PDF
  86. Federspiel, Ulrik /DENMARK/ Vice President Global Affairs, Haldor Topsøe A/S PDF
  87. Feldstein, Martin S. /USA/ George F. Baker Professor of Economics, Harvard University PDF
  88. Ferguson, Niall /USA/ Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University PDF
  89. Ferreira Alves, Clara /PORTUGAL/ CEO, Claref LDA; writer [123PDF
  90. Fillon, François /FRANCE/ Former Prime Minister PDF
  91. Fischer, Heinz /AUSTRIA/ Federal President PDF
  92. Fishman, Mark C. /USA/ President, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research PDF
  93. Flint, Douglas J. /UK/ Group Chairman, HSBC Holdings plc PDF
  94. Fu, Ying /CHINA/ Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  95. Gallagher, Paul /IRELAND/ Attorney General PDF
  96. Gates, William H. /USA/ Co-chair, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Chairman, Microsoft Corporation PDF
  97. Gephardt, Richard A. /USA/ President and CEO, Gephardt Group PDF
  98. Gfoeller, Michael /USA/ Political Consultant PDF
  99. Giannitsis, Anastasios /GREECE/ Former Minister of Interior; Professor of Development and International Economics, University of Athens PDF
  100. Goolsbee, Austan D. /USA/ Professor of Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business PDF
  101. Gordon, Philip H. /USA/ Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs PDF
  102. Graham, Donald E. /USA/ Chairman and CEO, The Washington Post Company PDF
  103. Groth, Hans /SWITZERLAND/ Senior Director, Healthcare Policy & Market Access, Oncology Business Unit, Pfizer Europe PDF
  104. Gruber, Lilli /ITALY/ Journalist – Anchorwoman, La 7 TV PDF
  105. Gucht, Karel de /BELGIUM/ Commissioner, European Commission PDF
  106. Guindos, Luis de /SPAIN/ Minister of Economy and Competitiveness PDF
  107. Gülek Domac, Tayyibe /TURKEY/ Former Minister of State [12PDF
  108. Gürel, Z. Damla /TURKEY/ Special Adviser to the President on EU Affairs [12PDF
  109. Gutzwiller, Felix /SWITZERLAND/ Member of the Swiss Council of States PDF
  110. Halberstadt, Victor /THE NETHERLANDS/ Professor of Economics, Leiden University; Former Honorary Secretary General of Bilderberg Meetings PDF
  111. Hardouvelis, Gikas A. /GREECE/ Chief Economist and Head of Research, Eurobank EFG PDF
  112. Harris, Britt /USA/ CIO, Teacher Retirement System of Texas PDF
  113. Heinonen, Olli /FINLAND/ Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School of Government PDF
  114. Henry, Simon /UK/ CFO, Royal Dutch Shell plc PDF
  115. Hermelin, Paul /FRANCE/ Chairman and CEO, Capgemini Group PDF
  116. Hoffman, Reid /USA/ Co-founder and Executive Chairman, LinkedIn PDF
  117. Hommen, Jan H.M. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chairman, ING Group PDF
  118. Hormats, Robert D. /USA/ Under Secretary for Economic, Energy and Agricultural Affairs PDF
  119. Huang, Yiping /CHINA/ Professor of Economics, China Center for Economic Research, Peking University PDF
  120. Hughes, Chris R. /USA/ Co-founder, Facebook PDF
  121. Huntsman, Jr., Jon M. /USA/ Chairman, Huntsman Cancer Foundation PDF
  122. Huyghebaert, Jan /BELGIUM/ Chairman of the Board of Directors, KBC Group PDF
  123. Ischinger, Wolfgang /GERMANY/ Chairman, Munich Security Conference; Global Head Government Relations, Allianz SE PDF
  124. Isla, Pablo /SPAIN/ Chairman and CEO, Inditex GroupPDF
  125. Ivanov, Igor S. /RUSSIA/ Associate member, Russian Academy of Science; President, Russian International Affairs Council PDF
  126. Jacobs, Kenneth M. /USA/ Chairman & CEO, LazardPDF
  127. Janom Steiner, Barbara /SWITZERLAND/ Head of the Department of Justice, Security and Health, Canton Grisons PDF
  128. Johansson, Ole /FINLAND/ Chairman, Confederation of the Finnish Industries EK PDF
  129. Johnson, James A. /USA/ Vice Chairman, Perseus, LLCPDF
  130. Jordan, Thomas J. /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman of the Governing Board, Swiss National Bank PDF
  131. Jordan, Jr., Vernon E. /USA/ Senior Managing Director, Lazard Frères & Co. LLC PDF
  132. Kaplan, Robert D. /USA/ Chief Geopolitical Analyst, Stratfor PDF
  133. Karp, Alexander /USA/ CEO, Palantir TechnologiesPDF
  134. Karsner, Alexander /USA/ Executive Chairman, Manifest Energy, Inc PDF
  135. Karvar, Anousheh /FRANCE/ Inspector, Inter-ministerial Audit and Evaluation Office for Social, Health, Employment and Labor Policies PDF
  136. Kasparov, Garry /RUSSIA/ Chairman, United Civil Front (of Russia) PDF
  137. Katainen, Jyrki /FINLAND/ Minister of Finance PDF
  138. Keane, John M. /USA/ Senior Partner, SCP PartnersPDF
  139. Kerr, John /UK/ Member, House of Lords; Deputy Chairman, Royal Dutch Shell plc. PDF
  140. Kerry, John /USA/ Senator for Massachusetts PDF
  141. Keyman, E. Fuat /TURKEY/ Director, Istanbul Policy Center and Professor of International Relations, Sabanci University PDF
  142. King Philippe of Belgium PDF
  143. Kissinger, Henry A. /USA/ Chairman, Kissinger Associates, Inc. PDF
  144. Kleinfeld, Klaus /USA/ Chairman and CEO, Alcoa PDF
  145. Knot, Klaas H.W. /THE NETHERLANDS/ President, De Nederlandsche Bank PDF
  146. Koç, Mustafa V. /TURKEY/ Chairman, Koç Holding A.Ş.PDF
  147. Koch, Roland /GERMANY/ CEO, Bilfinger Berger SEPDF
  148. Kodmani, Bassma /SYRIA/ Member of the Executive Bureau and Head of Foreign Affairs, Syrian National Council PDF
  149. Kravis, Henry R. /USA/ Founding Partner, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. PDF
  150. Kravis, Marie-Josée /USA/ Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute, Inc. PDF
  151. Kroes, Neelie /THE NETHERLANDS/ Commissioner, European Commission PDF
  152. Krupp, Fred /USA/ President, Environmental Defense Fund PDF
  153. Kudelski, André /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman and CEO, Kudelski Group SA PDF
  154. Kyriacopoulos, Ulysses /GREECE/ Chairman, S&B Industrial Minerals S.A. PDF
  155. Lambert, Richard /UK/ Independent Non-Executive Director, Ernst & Young PDF
  156. Lamy, Pascal /FRANCE/ Director General, World Trade Organization PDF
  157. Lander, Eric S. /USA/ President and Director, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT PDF
  158. Lauk, Kurt J. /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Economic Council to the CDU, Berlin PDF
  159. Lauvergeon, Anne /FRANCE/ Chairman of the Executive Board, AREVA PDF
  160. León Gross, Bernardino /SPAIN/ Secretary General, Office of the Prime Minister PDF
  161. Lessig, Lawrence /USA/ Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership, Harvard Law School; Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard UniversityPDF
  162. Letta, Enrico /ITALY/ Deputy Leader, Democratic Party (PD) PDF
  163. Leuthard, Doris /SWITZERLAND/ Federal CouncillorPDF
  164. Levite, Ariel E. /ISRAEL/ Nonresident Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace PDF
  165. Lévy, Maurice /FRANCE/ Chairman and CEO, Publicis Groupe S.A. PDF
  166. Leysen, Thomas /BELGIUM/ Chairman, Umicore, Chairman of the Board of Directors, KBC Group PDF
  167. Li, Cheng /USA/ Senior Fellow and Director of Research, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution PDF
  168. Lindner, Christian /GERMANY/ Party Leader, Free Democratic Party (FDP NRW) PDF
  169. Lipsky, John /USA/ Distinguished Visiting Scholar, Johns Hopkins University PDF
  170. Liveris, Andrew N. /USA/ President, Chairman and CEO, The Dow Chemical Company PDF
  171. Löfven, Stefan /SWEDEN/ Party Leader, Social Democratic Party (SAP) PDF
  172. Löscher, Peter /GERMANY/ Chairman of the Board of Management, Siemens AG PDF
  173. Lynn, William J. /USA/ Chairman and CEO, DRS Technologies, Inc. PDF
  174. Magnus, Birger /NORWAY/ Chairman, Storebrand ASA PDF
  175. Mandelson, Peter /UK/ Member, House of Lords; Chairman, Global Counsel PDF
  176. Mansbridge, Peter /CANADA/ Chief Correspondent, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation PDF
  177. Mathews, Jessica T. /USA/ President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace PDF
  178. McDowell, Michael /IRELAND/ Senior Counsel, Law Library; Former Deputy Prime Minister PDF
  179. Mchangama, Jacob /DENMARK/ Director of Legal Affairs, Center for Political Studies (CEPOS) PDF
  180. McKenna, Frank /CANADA/ Deputy Chair, TD Bank Financial Group PDF
  181. Mehlman, Kenneth B. /USA/ Partner, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co. PDF
  182. Micklethwait, John /UK/ Editor-in-Chief, The Economist PDF
  183. Montbrial, Thierry de /FRANCE/ President, French Institute for International Relations PDF
  184. Monti, Mario /ITALY/ President, Universita Commerciale Luigi Bocconi PDF
  185. Mordashov, Alexey A. /RUSSIA/ CEO, Severstal PDF
  186. Moreira da Silva, Jorge /PORTUGAL/ First Vice-President, Partido Social Democrata (PSD) PDF
  187. Moyo, Dambisa F. /ZAMBIA/ Economist and AuthorPDF
  188. Mundie, Craig J. /USA/ Chief Research and Strategy Officer, Microsoft Corporation PDF
  189. Myklebust, Egil /NORWAY/ Former Chairman of the Board of Directors SAS, Norsk Hydro ASA PDF
  190. Nagel, Alberto /ITALY/ CEO, Mediobanca PDF
  191. Naím, Moisés /USA/ Editor-in-Chief, Foreign PolicyPDF
  192. Nass, Matthias /GERMANY/ Chief International Correspondent, Die Zeit PDF
  193. Ng, Andrew Y. /USA/ Co-Founder, Coursera PDF
  194. Nin Génova, Juan María /SPAIN/ President and CEO, La Caixa PDF
  195. Nogueira Leite, António /PORTUGAL/ Member of the Board, José de Mello Investimentos, SGPS, SA PDF
  196. Noonan, Michael /IRELAND/ Minister for Finance PDF
  197. Noonan, Peggy /USA/ Author, Columnist, The Wall Street Journal PDF
  198. Nyrup Rasmussen, Poul /DENMARK/ Former Prime Minister PDF
  199. Oldham, John /UK/ National Clinical Lead for Quality and Productivity PDF
  200. Ollila, Jorma /FINLAND/ Chairman, Royal Dutch Shell plc PDF
  201. Omand, David /UK/ Visiting Professor, King’s College London PDF
  202. Orbinski, James /CANADA/ Professor of Medicine and Political Science, University of Toronto PDF
  203. Orszag, Peter R. /USA/ Director, Office of Management and Budget PDF
  204. Osborne, George /UK/ Chancellor of the ExchequerPDF
  205. Ottersen, Ole Petter /NORWAY/ Rector, University of Oslo PDF
  206. Ottolenghi, Emanuele /USA/ Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies PDF
  207. Özel, Soli /TURKEY/ Senior Lecturer, Kadir Has University; Columnist, Habertürk Newspaper PDF
  208. Özilhan, Tuncay /TURKEY/ Chairman, Anadolu GroupPDF
  209. Papaconstantinou, George (Papakonstantinou, Giorgos) /GREECE/ Minister of Finance PDF
  210. Papahelas, Alexis /GREECE/ Executive Editor, Kathimerini Newspaper PDF
  211. Papalexopoulos, Dimitri /GREECE/ Managing Director, Titan Cement Co. PDF
  212. Parker, Sean /USA/ Managing Partner, Founders Fund PDF
  213. Pavey, Şafak /TURKEY/ Member of Parliament (CHP)PDF
  214. Pechtold, Alexander /THE NETHERLANDS/ Parliamentary Leader, Democrats ’66 (D66) PDF
  215. Pécresse, Valérie /FRANCE/ Member of Parliament (UMP) PDF
  216. Pekin, Şefika /TURKEY/ Founding Partner, Pekin & Bayar Law Firm [12PDF
  217. Pentikäinen, Mikael /FINLAND/ Publisher and Senior Editor-in-Chief, Helsingin Sanomat PDF
  218. Perle, Richard N. /USA/ Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research PDF
  219. Petraeus, David H. /USA/ General, U.S. Army (Retired)PDF
  220. Polanco, Ignacio /SPAIN/ Chairman, Grupo PRISAPDF
  221. Polman, Paul /THE NETHERLANDS/ CEO, Unilever PLCPDF
  222. Portas, Paulo /PORTUGAL/ Minister of State and Foreign Affairs PDF
  223. Prichard, J. Robert S. /CANADA/ President and CEO, Metrolinx PDF
  224. Prince Haakon of Norway PDF
  225. Princess Beatrix of the Netherlands PDF
  226. Queen Sofía of Spain PDF
  227. Rabinovich, Itamar /ISRAEL/ Global Distinguished Professor, New York University PDF
  228. Rachman, Gideon /UK/ Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator, The Financial Times PDF
  229. Ramanantsoa, Bernard /FRANCE/ Dean, HEC Paris Group PDF
  230. Rangel, Paulo /PORTUGAL/ Member, European Parliament PDF
  231. Rattner, Steven /USA/ Chairman, Willett Advisors LLCPDF
  232. Redford, Alison M. /CANADA/ Premier of Alberta PDF
  233. Reding, Viviane /LUXEMBOURG/ Vice President and Commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship, European Commission PDF
  234. Reisman, Heather M. /CANADA/ Chair and CEO, Indigo Books & Music Inc. PDF
  235. Reitzle, Wolfgang /GERMANY/ CEO & President, Linde AG PDF
  236. Renström, Lars /SWEDEN/ President and CEO, Alfa Laval PDF
  237. Rey, Hélène /FRANCE/ Professor of Economics, London Business School PDF
  238. Rinnooy Kan, Alexander H.G. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Chairman, Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands (SER) PDF
  239. Robertson, Simon /UK/ Partner, Robertson Robey Associates LLP; Deputy Chairman, HSBC HoldingsPDF
  240. Rocca, Gianfelice /ITALY/ Chairman, Techint PDF
  241. Rockefeller, David /USA/ Former Chairman, Chase Manhattan Bank PDF
  242. Rodriguez Inciarte, Matías /SPAIN/ Executive Vice Chairman, Grupo Santander PDF
  243. Rogoff, Kenneth S. /USA/ Professor of Economics, Harvard University PDF
  244. Rompuy, Herman van /BELGIUM/ President, European Council PDF
  245. Rose, Charlie /USA/ Producer, Rose CommunicationsPDF
  246. Rosenthal, Uri /THE NETHERLANDS/ Minister of Foreign Affairs PDF
  247. Ross, Dennis B. /USA/ Counselor, Washington Institute for Near East Policy PDF
  248. Rostowski, Jacek /POLAND/ Minister of Finance PDF
  249. Roy, Olivier /FRANCE/ Professor of Social and Political Theory, European University Institute PDF
  250. Rubin, Robert E. /USA/ Co-Chairman, Council on Foreign Relations; Former Secretary of the TreasuryPDF
  251. Rutte, Mark /THE NETHERLANDS/ Prime Minister PDF
  252. Sabanci Dinçer, Suzan /TURKEY/ Chairman, AkbankPDF
  253. Sáenz de Santamaría Antón, Soraya /SPAIN/ Vice President and Minister for the Presidency PDF
  254. Scaroni, Paolo /ITALY/ CEO, Eni S.p.A. PDF
  255. Scheffer, Paul /THE NETHERLANDS/ Professor of European Studies, Tilburg University PDF
  256. Schieder, Andreas /AUSTRIA/ State Secretary of Finance PDF
  257. Schmid, Martin /SWITZERLAND/ President, Government of the Canton Grisons PDF
  258. Schmidt, Eric /USA/ CEO and Chairman of the Board, Google PDF
  259. Scholten, Rudolf /AUSTRIA/ Member of the Board of Executive Directors, Oesterreichische Kontrollbank AG PDF
  260. Scholz, Olaf /GERMANY/ Vice Chairman, SPD PDF
  261. Schütze, Peter /DENMARK/ Member of the Executive Management, Nordea Bank AB PDF
  262. Schweiger, Rolf /SWITZERLAND/ Member of the Swiss Council of States PDF
  263. Seguro, António José /PORTUGAL/ Secretary General, Socialist Party PDF
  264. Senard, Jean-Dominique /FRANCE/ CEO, Michelin Group PDF
  265. Shambaugh, David /USA/ Director, China Policy Program, George Washington University PDF
  266. Sheeran, Josette /USA/ Executive Director, United Nations World Food Programme PDF
  267. Siilasmaa, Risto /FINLAND/ Chairman of the Board of Directors, Nokia Corporation PDF
  268. Skogen Lund, Kristin /NORWAY/ Director General, Confederation of Norwegian Enterprise PDF
  269. Slaughter, Anne-Marie /USA/ Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 University Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University PDF
  270. Soiron, Rolf /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman of the Board, Holcim Ltd., Lonza Ltd. PDF
  271. Solana Madariaga, Javier /SPAIN/ Former Secretary General, Council of the European Union PDF
  272. Solberg, Erna /NORWAY/ Leader of the Conservative Party PDF
  273. Speyer, Jerry I. /USA/ Chairman and Co-CEO, Tishman Speyer PDF
  274. Steinberg, James B. /USA/ Deputy Secretary of StatePDF
  275. Steinbrück, Peer /GERMANY/ Member of the Bundestag; Former Minister of Finance PDF
  276. Stewart, Rory /UK/ Member of Parliament PDF
  277. Stigson, Björn /SWEDEN/ President, World Business Council for Sustainable Development PDF
  278. Summers, Lawrence H. /USA/ Director, National Economic Council PDF
  279. Supino, Pietro /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman and Publisher, Tamedia AG PDF
  280. Sutherland, Peter D. /IRELAND/ Chairman, Goldman Sachs International PDF
  281. Taylor, J. Martin /UK/ Chairman, Syngenta International AG PDF
  282. Teixeira dos Santos, Fernando /PORTUGAL/ Minister of State and Finance PDF
  283. Thiam, Tidjane /UK – IVORY COAST/ Group CEO, Prudential plc PDF
  284. Thiel, Peter A. /USA/ President, Clarium Capital Management, LLC PDF
  285. Thompson, Craig B. /USA/ President and CEO, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center PDF
  286. Timuray, Serpil /TURKEY/ CEO, Vodafone Turkey PDF
  287. Topsøe, Jakob Haldor /DENMARK/ Partner, AMBROX Capital A/S PDF
  288. Tremonti, Giulio /ITALY/ Minister of Economy and Finance PDF
  289. Trichet, Jean-Claude /FRANCE/ President, European Central Bank PDF
  290. Trittin, Jürgen /GERMANY/ Parliamentary Leader, Alliance 90/The Greens PDF
  291. Tsoukalis, Loukas /GREECE/ President, ELIAMEP PDF
  292. Tumpel-Gugerell, Gertrude /AUSTRIA/ Member of the Executive Board, European Central Bank PDF
  293. Urpilainen, Jutta /FINLAND/ Minister of Finance PDF
  294. Varney, Christine A. /USA/ Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust PDF
  295. Vasella, Daniel L. /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Novartis AG PDF
  296. Vaupel, James W. /USA/ Founding Director, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research PDF
  297. Vimont, Pierre /FRANCE/ Executive Secretary General, European External Action Service PDF
  298. Volcker, Paul A. /USA/ Chairman, Economic Recovery Advisory Board PDF
  299. Voser, Peter /UK – SWITZERLAND/ CEO, Royal Dutch Shell plc PDF
  300. Wahlroos, Björn /FINLAND/ Chairman, Sampo plcPDF
  301. Waldvogel, Francis A. /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Novartis Venture Fund PDF
  302. Wall, Brad /CANADA/ Premier of Saskatchewan PDF
  303. Wallenberg, Jacob /SWEDEN/ Chairman, Investor ABPDF
  304. Warsh, Kevin /USA/ Former Governor, Federal Reserve Board PDF
  305. Wellink, Nout /THE NETHERLANDS/ President, De Nederlandsche Bank PDF
  306. West, F.J. Bing /USA/ Author PDF
  307. Weston, Galen G. /CANADA/ Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited PDF
  308. Williams of Crosby, Shirley /UK/ Member, House of Lords PDF
  309. Winter, Jaap W. /THE NETHERLANDS/ Partner, De Brauw Blackstone Westbroek PDF
  310. Witmer, Jürg /SWITZERLAND/ Chairman, Givaudan SA and Clariant AG PDF
  311. Wolf, Martin H. /UK/ Chief Economics Commentator, The Financial Times PDF
  312. Wolfensohn, James D. /USA/ Chairman, Wolfensohn & Company, LLC PDF
  313. Wooldridge, Adrian D. /UK/ Business Correspondent, The Economist PDF
  314. Wright, Nigel S. /CANADA/ Chief of Staff, Office of the Prime Minister PDF
  315. Yergin, Daniel /USA/ Chairman, IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates PDF
  316. Zapatero, José Luis Rodríguez /SPAIN/ Prime MinisterPDF
  317. Zetsche, Dieter /GERMANY/ Chairman, Daimler AGPDF
  318. Zoellick, Robert B. /USA/ President, The World Bank Group PDF

MR M.J. MEIJER C.S

Notarial Firm for Bilderberg (123456)

  1. Borren, Hans [12] /Chairman Mr M.J. Meijer c.s/THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  2. Meijer, Maarten R. [123] /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

VIRTUAL BUILDING BV (Virtualbuilding.nl)

Website Service Provider for Bilderberg (12)

  1. Rademaker, Ron [1234] /Founder Virtual Building BV/THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

CONNECT HOLLAND BV (Connectholland.nl)

(Former) Website Service Provider for Bilderberg (1)

  1. Soeterbroek, Jeroen [12345] /Founder Connect Holland BV/THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

CFR

  1. Hills, Carla A. /USA/ PDF
  2. Rubenstein, David Mark /USA/ PDF
  3. Haass, Richard Nathan /USA/ PDF
  4. Abizaid, John P. /USA/ PDF
  5. Ackerman, Peter /USA/ PDF
  6. Albright, Madeleine K. /USA/ PDF
  7. Baird, Zoë /USA/ PDF
  8. Blinder, Alan S. /USA/ PDF
  9. Boies, Mary McInnis /USA/ PDF
  10. Bradley, David G. /USA/ PDF
  11. Brokaw, Tom /USA/ PDF
  12. Burns, R. Nicholas /USA/ PDF
  13. Denning, Steven A. /USA/ PDF
  14. Fink, Laurence D. /USA/ PDF
  15. Friedman, Stephen /USA/ PDF
  16. Fudge, Ann M. [2] /USA/ PDF
  17. Gann, Pamela /USA/ PDF
  18. Glocer, Thomas H. /USA/ PDF
  19. Henry, Peter B. /USA/ PDF
  20. Hill, J. Tomilson /USA/ PDF
  21. Hrinak, Donna J. /USA/ PDF
  22. Jackson, Shirley Ann /USA/ PDF
  23. Kent, Muhtar /USA/ PDF
  24. Miscik, Jami /USA/ PDF
  25. Owens, James W. /USA/ PDF
  26. Padrón, Eduardo J. /USA/ PDF
  27. Peterson, Peter G. /USA/ PDF
  28. Porat, Ruth /USA/ PDF
  29. Smith, Frederick W. /USA/ PDF
  30. Warner, Margaret /USA/ PDF
  31. Weber, Vin /USA/ PDF
  32. Whitman, Christine Todd /USA/ PDF
  33. Zakaria, Fareed /USA/ PDF
  34. Olson, Keith [photo unconfirmed!] /USA/ PDF
  35. Lindsay, James M. /USA/ PDF
  36. Faskianos, Irina A. /USA/ PDF
  37. Gelb, Leslie H. /USA/ PDF
  38. Greenberg, Maurice R. /USA/ PDF
  39. Annan, Kofi /GHANA – USA/ PDF
  40. Belo-Osagie, Hakeem /NIGERIA/ PDF
  41. Desmarais Jr., Paul /CANADA/ PDF
  42. Döpfner, Mathias /GERMANY/ PDF
  43. Carbajal, José Antonio Fernández /MEXICO/ PDF
  44. Halonen, Tarja /FINLAND/ PDF
  45. Ibrahim, Mohamed /SUDAN – UK/ PDF
  46. Jameel, Mohammed Abdul Latif /SAUDI ARABIA/ PDF
  47. Kelly, Gail /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  48. Kojima, Yorihiko /JAPAN/ PDF
  49. Mahindra, Anand /INDIA/ PDF
  50. Mansour, Mohamed /EGYPT/ PDF
  51. de Margerie, Christophe /FRANCE/ PDF
  52. Masiyiwa, Strive /ZIMBABWE/ PDF
  53. Ofer, Idan /ISRAEL/ PDF
  54. Olayan, Lubna /SAUDI ARABIA/ PDF
  55. Potanin, Vladimir /RUSSIA/ PDF
  56. Powell, Charles David /UK/ PDF
  57. Walujo, Patrick /INDONESIA/ PDF
  58. Xin, Zhang /CHINA/ PDF

NATO

  1. RasmussenAnders Fogh /DENMARK/ PDF
  2. VershbowAlexander /USA/ PDF
  3. LungescuOana /BELGIUM – ROMANIA/ PDF
  4. Høeg-JensenKasper /DENMARK/ PDF
  5. StamatopoulosThrasyvoulos Terry /GREECE/ PDF
  6. DucaruSorin /ROMANIA/ PDF
  7. AuroyPatrick /FRANCE/ PDF
  8. BraussHeinrich /GERMANY/ PDF
  9. BushWayne J. /USA/ PDF
  10. Grabar-KitarovićKolinda /CROATIA/ PDF
  11. EvansStephen /UK/ PDF
  12. SmithStephen F. /USA/ PDF
  13. HillSteven /USA/ PDF
  14. ChagnotStéphane /FRANCE/ PDF

EU

  1. AshtonCatherine /UK/ PDF
  2. KallasSiim /ESTONIA/ PDF
  3. Tajani, Antonio /ITALY – FRANCE/ PDF
  4. Šefčovič, Maroš /SLOVAKIA/ PDF
  5. Rehn, Olli /FINLAND/ PDF
  6. Potočnik, Janez /SLOVENIA/ PDF
  7. Piebalgs, Andris /LATVIA/ PDF
  8. Barnier, Michel /FRANCE/ PDF
  9. Vassiliou, Androulla /CYPRUS/ PDF
  10. Šemeta, Algirdas /LITHUANIA/ PDF
  11. Geoghegan-Quinn, Máire /IRELAND/ PDF
  12. Lewandowski, Janusz /POLAND/ PDF
  13. Damanaki, Maria /GREECE/ PDF
  14. Georgieva, Kristalina /BULGARIA/ PDF
  15. Oettinger, Günther /GERMANY/ PDF
  16. Hahn, Johannes /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  17. Hedegaard, Connie /DENMARK/ PDF
  18. Füle, Štefan /CZECH REPUBLIC/ PDF
  19. Andor, László /HUNGARY/ PDF
  20. Malmström, Cecilia /BELGIUM – SWEDEN/ PDF
  21. Cioloş, Dacian /ROMANIA/ PDF
  22. Borg, Tonio /MALTA/ PDF
  23. Mimica, Neven /CROATIA/ PDF
  24. Guy Verhofstadt /BELGIUM – ITALY/ PDF
  25. Draghi, Mario /ITALY/ PDF
  26. Constâncio, Vítor Manuel Ribeiro /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  27. Cœuré, Benoît /FRANCE/ PDF
  28. Lautenschläger, Sabine /GERMANY/ PDF
  29. Mersch, Yves /LUXEMBOURG/ PDF
  30. Praet, Peter /BELGIUM/ PDF
  31. O’Mahoney, John [12] /IRELAND/ PDF
  32. Esteban Perez, Francisco /SPAIN/ PDF
  33. Bolkestein, Frederik /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  34. de Hoop Scheffer, Jakob Gijsbert /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF

OSCE

  1. Krivokapic, Ranko /MONTENEGRO/ PDF
  2. Burkhalter, Didier /SWITZERLAND/ PDF
  3. Voridis, Makis /GREECE/ PDF
  4. Guliyev, Azay /AZERBAIJAN/ PDF
  5. Kauma, Pia /FINLAND/ PDF
  6. Aknazarova, Roza /KYRGYZSTAN/ PDF
  7. Sena, Nilza /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  8. Williams, Roger /UK/ PDF
  9. Santos, Isabel /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  10. Kulkuloglu, Mehmet Sevki /TURKEY/ PDF
  11. Comic, Gordana /SERBIA/ PDF

AIPAC

  1. Kohr, Howard /USA/ PDF
  2. Fishman, Richard /USA/ PDF
  3. Kern, Chrystal [1234] /USA/ PDF

ADL

  1. FoxmanAbraham H. /USA/ PDF
  2. Curtiss-LusherBarry /USA/ PDF

CFI

  1. Polak, Stuart [12] /UK/ PDF
  2. Tamam, Nathalie [12] /UK/ PDF
  3. Gurd, James [12] /UK/ PDF
  4. Stark, Leetal [12] /UK/ PDF
  5. Akademir, Sedef [1 ,23] /UK/ PDF
  6. Murkes, Tanyah [123] /ISRAEL/ PDF

BICOM

  1. Zabludowicz, Chaim Poju [12] /UK/ PDF
  2. Kehoe, Dermot /UK/ PDF
  3. Fineberg, Tony /UK/ PDF
  4. Pater, Richard /ISRAEL/ PDF

MAGNA BSP

  1. Siboni, Haim /ISRAEL/ PDF

AIJAC

  1. Leibler, Marc /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  2. Keen, Paul /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  3. Rubenstein, Colin /AUSTRALIA/ PDF

OSF

  1. Soros, George /USA/ PDF
  2. Stone, Christopher /USA/ PDF

RIT CAPITAL PARTNERS

  1. Rothschild, Nathaniel Charles Jacob [123] /UK/ PDF

GENEL ENERGY

  1. Rothschild, Nathaniel Philip Victor James [12] /SWITZERLAND – UK/ PDF

TRILATERAL COMMISSION

  1. Dlouhy, Vladimír /CZECH REPUBLIC/ PDF
  2. Fuchs, Michael /GERMANY/ PDF
  3. Nye, Joseph S. Jr. /USA/ PDF
  4. Prentice, Jim /CANADA/ PDF
  5. Serra, Jaime /MEXICO/ PDF
  6. Hasegawa, Yasuchika /JAPAN/ PDF
  7. Seok-hyun, Hong /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  8. Wanandi, Jusuf /INDONESIA/ PDF

PEKING UNIVERSITY

  • Strong, Maurice F. [123]/CHINA/ PDF

(FORMER) HEADS OF STATE / GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS

  1. BushGeorge H. W. /USA/ PDF
  2. ClintonWilliam J. /USA/ PDF
  3. Clinton, Hillary Diane Rodham /USA/ PDF
  4. BushGeorge W. /USA/ PDF
  5. ObamaBarack H. /USA/ PDF
  6. PeresShimon /ISRAEL/ PDF
  7. NetanyahuBenjamin /ISRAEL/ PDF
  8. Queen Elizabeth Alexandra Mary /UK/ PDF
  9. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales /UK/ PDF
  10. Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh /UK/ PDF
  11. Blair, Tony /UK/ PDF
  12. Di RupoElio /BELGIUM/ PDF
  13. HarperStephen /CANADA/ PDF
  14. Queen Margrethe Alexandrine Þórhildur Ingrid/DENMARK/ PDF
  15. Thorning-Schmidt, Helle /DENMARK/ PDF
  16. Sarkozy, Nicolas /FRANCE/ PDF
  17. Hollande, François /FRANCE/ PDF
  18. Valls, Manuel /FRANCE/ PDF
  19. Ayrault, Jean-Marc /FRANCE/ PDF
  20. Napolitano, Giorgio /ITALY/ PDF
  21. Renzi, Matteo /ITALY/ PDF
  22. Berlusconi, Silvio /ITALY/ PDF
  23. King Harald V /NORWAY/ PDF
  24. Stoltenberg, Jens /NORWAY/ PDF
  25. Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani /QATAR/ PDF
  26. Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani/QATAR/ PDF
  27. Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias /SPAIN/ PDF
  28. Rajoy Brey, Mariano /SPAIN/ PDF
  29. Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands PDF
  30. Gusenbauer, Alfred /AUSTRIA/ PDF
  31. Kamov, Nikolai /BULGARIA/ PDF
  32. Harris, Mike /CANADA/ PDF
  33. Lord, Bernard /CANADA/ PDF
  34. Chrétien, Joseph Jacques Jean /CANADA/ PDF
  35. Martin, Paul Edgar Philippe /CANADA/ PDF
  36. Heinäluoma, Eero Olavi /FINLAND/ PDF
  37. Niinistö, Sauli Väinämö /FINLAND/ PDF
  38. Vanhanen, Matti Taneli /FINLAND/ PDF
  39. Westerwelle, Guido /GERMANY/ PDF
  40. Schmidt, Helmut Heinrich Waldemar /GERMANY/PDF
  41. Merkel, Angela Dorothea /GERMANY/ PDF
  42. Fischer, Joseph Martin Joschka /GERMANY/ PDF
  43. Alogoskoufis, George /GREECE/ PDF
  44. Bakoyannis, Dora /GREECE/ PDF
  45. Diamantopoulou, Anna /GREECE/ PDF
  46. Stournaras, Yiannis /GREECE/ PDF
  47. Papathanasiou, Yannis /GREECE/ PDF
  48. Bjarnason, Björn /ICELAND/ PDF
  49. Oddsson, Davíð /ICELAND/ PDF
  50. Haarde, Geir Hilmar /ICELAND/ PDF
  51. Sigurðsson, Jón /ICELAND/ PDF
  52. Gleeson, Dermot /IRELAND/ PDF
  53. Noonan, Michael /IRELAND/ PDF
  54. Bonino, Emma /ITALY/ PDF
  55. Tanaka, Nobuo /JAPAN/ PDF
  56. Lubbers, Ruud /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  57. Kok, Wim /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  58. Balkenende, Jan Peter /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  59. Verhagen, Maxime Jacques Marcel /THE NETHERLANDS/ PDF
  60. Jensen, Siv /NORWAY/ PDF
  61. Clemet, Kristin /NORWAY/ PDF
  62. de Pinho, Manuel António Gomes de Almeida/PORTUGAL/ PDF
  63. Sócrates Carvalho Pinto de Sousa, José /PORTUGAL/PDF
  64. Aguiar-Branco, José Pedro /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  65. de Santana Lopes, Pedro Miguel /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  66. Sarmento, Nuno Morais /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  67. da Costa, António Luís dos Santos /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  68. Rio, Rui Fernando da Silva /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  69. Leite, Maria Manuela Dias Ferreira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  70. Silva, Augusto Santos /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  71. de Sousa, Marcelo Rebelo /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  72. Guterres, António Manuel de Oliveira /PORTUGAL/PDF
  73. Rodrigues, Eduardo Luís Barreto Ferro /PORTUGAL/PDF
  74. de Sampaio, Jorge Fernando Branco /PORTUGAL/PDF
  75. Amaral, Luís Mira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  76. Constâncio, Vítor Manuel Ribeiro /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  77. Ferreira, José Medeiros /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  78. do Amaral, Joaquim Ferreira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  79. Barreto, António Miguel de Morais /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  80. Cravinho, João Cardona Gomes /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  81. Nabo, Francisco Luís Murteira /PORTUGAL/ PDF
  82. Olechowski, Andrzej Marian /POLAND/ PDF
  83. Suchocka, Hanna /POLAND/ PDF
  84. Moratinos Cuyaubé, Miguel Ángel /SPAIN/ PDF
  85. Solbes Mira, Pedro /SPAIN/ PDF
  86. Fälldin, Nils Olof Thorbjörn /SWEDEN/ PDF
  87. Olofsson, Maud Elisabeth /SWEDEN/ PDF
  88. Reinfeldt, John Fredrik /SWEDEN/ PDF
  89. Sahlin, Mona Ingeborg /SWEDEN/ PDF
  90. Blocher, Christoph /SWITZERLAND/ PDF
  91. Ashdown, Paddy /UK/ PDF
  92. Carington, Peter Alexander Rupert /UK/ PDF
  93. Gascoyne-Cecil, Robert Michael James /UK/ PDF
  94. Healey, Denis Winston /UK/ PDF
  95. Monks, John Stephen /UK/ PDF
  96. Owen, David Anthony Llewellyn /UK/ PDF
  97. Rifkind, Malcolm Leslie /UK/ PDF
  98. Hannay, David Hugh Alexander /UK/ PDF
  99. Brown, Gordon /UK/ PDF
  100. Berger, Samuel Richard /USA/ PDF
  101. Geithner, Timothy Franz /USA/ PDF
  102. Hamilton, Lee Herbert /USA/ PDF
  103. Powell, Colin Luther /USA/ PDF
  104. Rice, Condoleezza /USA/ PDF
  105. Shultz, George Pratt /USA/ PDF
  106. Daschle, Thomas Andrew /USA/ PDF
  107. Edwards, Johnny Reid /USA/ PDF
  108. Hagel, Charles Timothy /USA/ PDF
  109. Nunn, Samuel Augustus Jr. /USA/ PDF
  110. Perry, James Richard /USA/ PDF
  111. Sanford, Marshall Clement Jr. /USA/ PDF
  112. Sebelius, Kathleen /USA/ PDF
  113. Arapoglou, Takis /GREECE/ PDF
  114. McDonough, William Joseph /USA/ PDF
  115. Bernanke, Ben Shalom /USA/ PDF
  116. Yousfi, Youcef /ALGERIA/ PDF
  117. Boudou, Amado /ARGENTINA/ PDF
  118. Sargsyan, Serzh /ARMENIA/ PDF
  119. Bishop, Julie /AUSTRALIA/ PDF
  120. Aliyev, Ilham /AZERBAIJAN/ PDF
  121. Temer, Michel /BRAZIL/ PDF
  122. Valenzuela, Heraldo Muñoz /CHILE/ PDF
  123. Jinping, Xi /CHINA/ PDF
  124. Bělobrádek, Pavel /CZECH REPUBLIC/ PDF
  125. Loza, Hamdi Sanad /EGYPT/ PDF
  126. Ondimba, Ali Bongo /GABON/ PDF
  127. Garibashvili, Irakli /GEORGIA/ PDF
  128. Martonyi, János /HUNGARY/ PDF
  129. Khurshid, Salman /INDIA/ PDF
  130. Boediono /INDONESIA/ PDF
  131. Noble, Ronald Kenneth /USA/ PDF
  132. Steinitz, Yuval /ISRAEL/ PDF
  133. Abe, Shinzō /JAPAN/ PDF
  134. ibn al-Hussein, Abdullah II /JORDAN/ PDF
  135. Nazarbayev, Nursultan Äbishuly /KAZAKHSTAN/ PDF
  136. Grybauskaitė, Dalia /LITHUANIA/ PDF
  137. bin Yassin, Muhyiddin /MALAYSIA/ PDF
  138. Gómez-Robledo, Juan Manuel /MEXICO/ PDF
  139. Mezouar, Salaheddine /MOROCCO/ PDF
  140. Key, John Phillip /NEW ZEALAND/ PDF
  141. Jonathan, Goodluck Ebele Azikiwe /NIGERIA/ PDF
  142. Sharif, Mian Muhammad Nawaz /PAKISTAN/ PDF
  143. Sikorski, Radosław Tomasz /POLAND/ PDF
  144. Băsescu, Traian /ROMANIA/ PDF
  145. Lavrov, Sergey Viktorovich /RUSSIA/ PDF
  146. Yamani, Hashim [12] /SAUDI ARABIA/ PDF
  147. Hsien Loong, Lee /SINGAPORE/ PDF
  148. Nkoana-Mashabane, Maite Emily /SOUTH AFRICA/PDF
  149. Geun-hye, Park /SOUTH KOREA/ PDF
  150. Phuangketkeow, Sihasak /THAILAND/ PDF
  151. Gül, Abdullah /TURKEY/ PDF
  152. Yatsenyuk, Arseniy Petrovych /UKRAINE/ PDF
  153. bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, Mohammed /ABU DHABI – UAE/ PDF
  154. Nguyễn, Tấn Dũng /VIETNAM/ PDF
  155. Erdoğan, Recep Tayyip /TURKEY/ PDF
  156. Putin, Vladimir /RUSSIA/ PDF
  157. Prince William, Duke of Cambridge /UK/ PDF
  158. Medvedev, Dmitry Anatolyevich /RUSSIA/ PDF
  159. Brzezinski, Zbigniew Kazimierz /USA/ PDF

CATHOLIC CHURCH

  1. Ratzinger, Joseph Aloisius /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  2. Bergoglio, Jorge Mario /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  3. Tauran, Jean-Louis /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  4. von Freyberg, Ernst [12] /VATICAN – ITALY – GERMANY/ PDF
  5. Castelló, Santos Abril y /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF
  6. Ricca, Battista Mario Salvatore /VATICAN – ITALY/PDF
  7. Marranci, Rolando /VATICAN – ITALY/ PDF

RELIGIOUS ZIONIST MOVEMENT

  1. Lior, Dov [12] /ISRAEL/ PDF
  2. Dahan, Eli Ben [12] /ISRAEL/ PDF

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Source.

Marines Were Ready to Fight Feds at Bundy Ranch

A crown temple B.A.R. attorney wearing the black robe of Saturn ordered the foreign terrorist Bureau of Land Management to invade the land called Nevada. This crown temple B.A.R. attorney masquerading as a government official/federal judge is an agent of City of London working for the International Monetary Fund.

The Bundy Ranch terrorism was caused by the crown/vatican/swiss banking cabal. That is who the B.A.R. association serves. that is who occupies the District of Columbia.

United States of America is a foreign, bankrupt corporation operating under martial law. The Crown/Vatican/Swiss banking cabal took over via the District of Columbia Organic Act of 1871 which was a coup d’état.

A Whole New World: China reclaims Economic Superpower Crown from USA

by Lady Michelle-Jennifer Santos, Chief Visionary Founder & Owner

Sunday, Sept. 28 (TSR) – Leaders and citizens in developed nations need to be prepared for a major psychological, economic, cultural and political shift, which will impact the rest of this century. From Monday and beyond,China reclaims her crown as top World Economic Superpower, demoting theUnited States of America into second place.

According to estimates released by the World Bank’s International Comparison Program (ICP), China’s purchasing power-adjusted GDP is higher than originally thought which resulted in a radical change in calculations of comparable basket of goods and services across the globe, so-called purchasing-power parity (PPP). Using the cost of living data in 199 countries in 2011, the Dragon’s rise as world’s biggest economy is five years sooner than most economists had previously expected. Based on the new data and comparison from the previous survey in 2005, China performs to an astounding 20% higher result than what many economists thought.

China’s rise over the past decade has indeed been dramatic and its economic success on the world stage is impressive.

For the past 30 years, the annual growth rate has been around 10 percent. Based on conventional measurements, China overtook the United Kingdom in 2006 to become the world’s fourth largest economy. In 2009 it moved past Germany and in 2010 it drove out Japanto become the world’s second largest economy.

China has overtaken the U.S. as the world’s largest trading nation, taking the title in 2013 and has been the world’s largest exporter since 2009, and is now the world’s largest trader overall.

Powered by 1.4 billion people who both produce and consume goods, China’s trade surpassed $4 trillion in 2012, with exports rising 7.9 percent and imports rising 7.3 percent. The nation’s trade surplus, or what the country is profiting by is almost $260 billion for 2013.

Based on purchasing power parity (PPP), the figures suggest that China’s GDP will reach $17.9 trillion by end-2014, compared to $17.5 trillion for the US. This is a contrast to the IMF’s calculations on GDP using current price levels and market exchange rates, which puts US GDP in 2014 at $17.5 trillion and China’s at $10.0 trillion as Lúcio Vinhas de Souza, a Moody’s Managing Director and Sovereign Chief Economist, explained in May this year.

In the past decade, China has managed to maintain its GDP growth rate between 8-9 percent. It is that consistency that has garnered them their rightful place.

China has long set its sights on becoming the world’s dominant economic powerhouse, as well as a dominant figure in Asian politics. To accomplish this, the nation has cracked down on inaccurate and inflated trade numbers, which it no longer needs to inflate to make itself appear powerful. China has accomplished its initial mission.

“While it had been expected that China’s GDP would surpass US GDP in the medium term, new estimates — compiled by the World Bank’s ICP — indicate that China’s emergence as the world’s biggest economy will take place by the end of this year, five years sooner than most economists had previously expected,” Vinhas de Souza said in May.

Some economists based their calculations on nominal GDP and estimate that it would be few more years for China to become number one. However, many economists including those of the World Bank and IMF as well as investment banks around the world are banking on purchasing power-adjusted GDP, which is believed to be more accurate and stable.

PPP exchange rates provide a more representative way to compare the relative size of economies than volatile market exchange rates, as price levels, especially for non-tradable goods and services, are normally higher in high-income economies,” Vinhas de Souza explained.

Market exchange rates are also influenced by factors such as currency speculation, interest rates, government intervention, and capital flows between economies.

The same World Bank data, which was released in April 2014 — also highlights the rising economic importance of middle income economies. The report shows the ascending rankings of India, Russia, Brazil, Indonesia,Saudi Arabia and Turkey,which accounted for 31.6% of global GDP in 2011, and is an increase of 9.0 percent from the 22.6% in 2005.

In the same the report, the share of global GDP for the other 13 largest economies, classified as high-income economies, decreased to 44.9% from 56.3% over the same period.

Using also the PPP methodology, China now accounts for the largest share of the world’s investment expenditure at 27%, compared with 13% for the United States.

Asia and the Pacific, including China and India, accounts for 30% of world GDP, Eurostat-OECD 54%, Latin America 5.5% (excluding Mexico, which participates in the OECD, and Argentina, which did not participate and Argentina, which did not participate in ICP 2011), Africa and Western Asia about 4.5% each.

In terms of investment at 27%, China now has the largest share of the world’s expenditure for investment (gross fixed capital formation), followed by the United States at 13%, India (7%), Japan (4%) and Indonesia (3%).

Americans Most Woefully Unprepared of What’s To Come

Congratulations, President Xi Jinping.

As the world’s center of gravity now shifts to Asia as of next week, the United States of America – its leaders and citizens, who still live under prideful denial and arrogant ignorance, is the woefully unprepared of all by this incoming tectonic shift.

Until today, American leaders and the public refuse to listen and open their eyes, especially neocon, zionist (and tea party) warmongers.

Lost in the illusion that they are “the sole beacon of light in a dark and unstable world” and severely suffering from Savior Complex, most Americans are blind to a simple, mathematical truth: With just 400 million people, the United States can no longer deny the global economy’s new realities for much longer. With nearly $18 trillion in ever growing debt due to warmongering and irresponsible fiscal governance, they can no longer dominate the rest of the world, because Asians, with 60% of the world’s population, are now the best performers.

Asia’s middle class is transforming at an accelerated pace. Expected to skyrocket from roughly 500 million people today to 1.75 billion by 2020, it will inevitably catapult Asia from economic power to global leadership.

China’s number 1 position is particularly important when calculating the balance of power and the distribution of voting strengths in international organizations. The Asians, in particular the Chinese, can now officially flex its own muscles by demonstrating its economic strength, which also gives it influential political power.

China’s stature and influence, affects and changes the balance of power on a global scale, something that United States has had nightmare from for awhile now, which should explain all the destabilisations that has been going on from Arabspring, Libya, Syria, Sudan, Ukraine, now Iraq to name a few.

Case in point, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank.

In July, the BRICS countries agreed to start a New Development Bank (NDB) with $100 billion in capital where China will contribute nearly half, or $41 billion, of the total, with Russia, Brazil and India chipping in $18 billion apiece and South Africa contributing $5 billion respectively. Together, the five emerging economic giants, which generate about a quarter of the world’s economic output and hold 40 percent of the world’s population, will maintain majority control over the new institution.

The multilateral NDB is a clear hard slap at the U.S. dominated World Bank and IMF, who have hesitated for years to make changes to reflect and accommodate the fact that China is poised to overtake the U.S. as the world’s largest economy, plus nearly half the world’s economic activity now occurs in the developing world.

In an added show of defiance and disenchantment with the U.S. and its allies, the BRICS plan to establish a major new alternative pool of $100 billion in currency reserves that they would maintain and control outside the IMF. Once the new bank starts borrowing in global financial markets, this will likely outstrip the size of the World Bank, with annual lending of $34 billion as some analysts predict.

The new BRICS-led institutions will change the global finance landscape that was established by the U.S. and its European allies after World War II. The move is seen as breath of hope for many struggling nations who suffered from the hands of American unjust policies.

By 2040, USA will be a dwarf

A few years ago, Nobel economist and a renown China scholar Robert W. Fogel bluntly warned the world what’s ahead with the headline of a Foreign Policy feature: “$123,000,000,000,000: Why China’s Economy Will Grow to $123 Trillion by 2040.”

“In 2040, the Chinese economy will reach $123 trillion, or nearly three times the economic output of the entire globe in 2000. China’s per-capita income will hit $85,000, more than double the forecast for the European Union, and also much higher than that of India and Japan as China moves “from a poor country in 2000 to a superrich country in 2040,” he wrote.

America’s per-capita wealth may be higher, says Fogel, but “China’s share of global GDP — 40% — will dwarf that of the United States (14%) and the European Union (5%) 30 years from now.”

Unfortunately, America’s myopic warmongering adventures, is not helping the situation, creating more war debt rather than jobs.

The US keeps sliding into a no-growth economy, to 1% GDP growth in a generation. The Americans can thank warmongers like Sen. John McCain, the other neocons and Zionists who conned the US into the $3 trillion Iraq War, Libya, Syria and now the ISIS (permanent) war, who still believe the future will be won by aggression, armies, battleships and a half trillion a year defense budget. Because of them, the US continues to crumble from within: Poor infrastructure, rising taxes, political corruption, decaying educational system, dumbed down population, obesity, rise in violence, militarized police, while jobs and profits go overseas fattening foreign economies.

Moral decay is also a huge factor in the nation’s decline.

Whereas, Asia is speeding way ahead and winning the economic and political war.

In comparison, with China’s massive flowing profits flowing, the country has evolved into a new phase of hegemony which includes a number of things. Mao is now replaced by Edmund Burke as revolution becomes passé and conservatism entrenches the establishment, which is the Communist Party. America is more communistic than China per today.

In the high finance arena, the nation has expressed their goal to become the world’s reserve currency and gold exchange capital.

The Chinese government has been actively seeking to internationalise the renminbi to match China’s global economic status. Their policy is to promote international use of the renminbi in three stages through trade, investment and as a reserve currency. The Chinese dream is around the corner: The renminbi (RMB) – the official currency of China – is poised and expected to join the US dollar and the euro as one of the world’s top three global trading currencies in terms of volume by the end of 2015, and within five years, it could be fully convertible, bypassing the Japanese Yen.

Earlier this month, UK government embraced what is inevitable, and now plans to issue the “world’s first” Renminbi (RMB) denominated sovereign bond outside China “in the coming weeks” and will be used to finance the government’s reserves of foreign currency.

China is already one of the world’s largest investors in Africa and Latin America, both continents which remain very rich in natural resources.

The Chinese are also now developing a Moon landing program as they aim to become the second country to land a person on the Moon.

China has resurrected as a dynamic and rapidly growing economy with a greater vision for regional influence – staking controversial territorial claims and spending billions more each year on army, navy and airforce, building up their military, modernizing equipment and constructing new assets – to project power further into the Pacific and South China Sea.

All this while it keeps investing in its future, creating jobs, building infrastructure, working towards clean energy, building high speed trains to connect Asia with Europe, rebuild the New Silk Road to connect the entire world, funding education and technology and its GDP soars.

Under the leadership of Prime Minister Li Keqiang and President Xi Jinping, the government has been vigilant in cleaning out corruption and deviant uncivilised behavior, with crackdown on people slandering and explicit pornographic content on websites. The Chinese are resurrecting Confucian values.

Beware the historical ignorance that the propagandists have been spewing. China has never colonised any overseas territories nor they plan to do so. They are and have been consistent with their peaceful development.

This is the most dramatic power shifts in human history. This is the true transformation which Americans and the West must learn to embrace and must abandon ingrained barbaric ideas and old assumptions.

The door is now being open to liberate unthinkable thoughts and to think the unthinkable. It is time stop denying the end of American dominance in world affairs.

Behold, the Warmongering Century ends, and the Peace Warrior Century begins.

Welcome back, Middle Earth Kingdom.

Source.

Judge Napolitano: A Nation of Sheep

Judge Napolitano delivers an excellent presentation on how the Constitution of the United States has been eroded. -LW